Author(s): Susmita Parija

Email(s): Parijasusmita2@gmail.com

DOI: 10.52711/2321-5828.2021.00012   

Address: Dr. Susmita Parija*
Associate Professor, Arya School of management and Information Technology, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India.
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 12,      Issue - 2,     Year - 2021


ABSTRACT:
This paper is an attempt to examine the socio-economic-political status of Indian diaspora in their adopted countries. Indian diaspora as a chariot of congenial International relationship between India and their adopted countries. The study also takes into account the unique socio-economic and cultural prospect that the diaspora offers to their adopted countries. As the Global Migration Report 2020 reveals India as a country of having 17.5 million international migrants to the different parts of world. In past two decades, this number has been rising substantially. Consequently, India is recipient of the highest remittance of $ 78.6 billion which is 3.4% of India’s GDP. Indian diaspora plays a major role equally in the politics, economy, diplomatic ties of both the host and home country in addition to promoting Indian culture and garnering support for India at major International forums. Although Indian diaspora exists across the world yet only certain regions of the world are highly concentrated due to various reasons. Indian government has been very serious to reap dividend of Indian diaspora, through policies, to develop India further. But, apart from this picture, this section faces certain challenges and vulnerabilities also. The challenges may vary from region to region and so may the strategies to deal with these challenges. In last two decades, Indian government as well as its state governments have not only become receptive recognizing their relevance for home country-state but also have become dynamically vigilante to their needs. As recent Covid-19 pandemic has surfaced new challenges for migrants across globe, Indian migrants, especially for a better education or livelihood, are no exception. But, the prompt action of Indian government to evacuate them from foreign land, during pandemic, is a recent example. Furthermore, the pandemic has thrown new fears challenges as well. Yet, how the Indian diaspora would survive and flourish post-Covid pandemic is still obscure.


Cite this article:
Susmita Parija. A journey through the realms of the Great Indian Diaspora and India’s diaspora engagement policy. Research Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences. 2021; 12(2):71-5. doi: 10.52711/2321-5828.2021.00012

Cite(Electronic):
Susmita Parija. A journey through the realms of the Great Indian Diaspora and India’s diaspora engagement policy. Research Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences. 2021; 12(2):71-5. doi: 10.52711/2321-5828.2021.00012   Available on: https://rjhssonline.com/AbstractView.aspx?PID=2021-12-2-4


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